Under the Hood

Tips for Keeping Your Car Cool in Summer

Ever complain about how hot your car, truck or SUV can get in the heat of July and August? There are plenty of simple things you can do. From maximizing your air conditioning to taking advantage of a shady spot when parking, the following tips can help you maintain a cooler vehicle on those hot summer days Block Car Windows from the Sun Cars can trap heat, causing the temperature inside them to quickly rise. According to one test, a parked car’s temperature rose from 80 degrees to more than 94 degrees in about two minutes and reached 123 degrees within an hour. A car can reach up to 200 degrees inside, according to Consumer Reports. Reducing the amount of heat entering through your windows may help keep your car cooler, making it more comfortable when it’s time to take a ride. Here are some tips to help keep your car cool in the summer: • Sun shades: Sun shades help block the direct rays coming into your vehicle. This keeps the temperature slightly lower, which can help your car cool down more quickly once the vehicle is started. • Tinted windows: A more expensive, yet constant way to block the sun is with window tinting. But before you take your car in to have the windows darkened, check out ODOT’s FAQ, to review the restrictions on how much or which windows you can tint. • Covered parking: If you don’t have tinted windows or a sun shade, a helpful alternative may simply be parking in the shade. Looking for a shady spot or parking your car so the sun is hitting the rear window instead of the windshield. This may help keep the steering wheel and front seats slightly cooler. • Cracked windows: Because windows hold in warm air, leaving them open slightly while parked will create slight airflow. If your vehicle has a sunroof, you can also crack that or use the vent feature if it’s not raining. For both windows and sunroofs, only leave them open slightly (less than an inch) to help minimize the possibility of theft.
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Tyler's Automotive offers DEQ too!

DID YOU KNOW WE CAN HELP TAKE CARE OF YOUR DEQ? That’s right! In addition to the other services and products we can provide, we can now take care of your DEQ, too! We are one of the approved Business Participants in the DEQ Too program which allows us to transmit your vehicle emissions data to DEQ! No more waiting in lines and your new registration stickers arrive in the mail from DMV within as few as 3 business days. We can do this for you and send you on your way within a short time! We will be ready for you any time during our normal business hours! We are open Monday thru Friday 8am-6pm. We offer this data transmittal for any eligible vehicle (typically 2005 or newer) and charge you a $32 device-usage fee which is in addition to the cost DEQ’s Clean Air Certificate of Compliance. If your car does not pass, there is no cost to you. We accept most forms of payment including cash and credit cards. You can learn more about the details of eligibility and fee amounts here. Tyler's Automotive DEQ TOO Information.
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5 Best Summer Car Care Tips

Summer is the season for beaches, barbecues – and breakdowns. Even though summer means fun, the hotter months have a way of wreaking havoc on your vehicle. Extreme weather can cause potholes and damage tires, while residue leftover from winter corrodes the components that make your vehicle work. And, with the additional road trip traffic, it’s probably not a surprise that July and August are two of the most fatal months for traffic accidents, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. From small steps such as cleaning the floor mats to bigger ones that require you to pop the hood, there are several ways you can make your ride safer and more comfortable, too. Here are our top tips for keeping your car cool and running this summer. 1) Keep it clean Review wiper blades, seals and other rubber components for winter wear and tear. Replace them if needed, and make sure you wash off any road salt, remember this is the first year that ODOT used salt on the roads before it has a chance to corrode.  Remember washing the car can be a great family time event, when you do wash your car, do it in the shade to prevent hard water spots. A coat of wax every three months helps protect the paint, too. 2) Check the tires Summer weather makes the air inside your tires expand, putting them at greater risk for a blowout. Avoid over- or underinflating your tires by checking the pressure regularly. Adjust the pressure according to the specifications listed on the sticker on the driver’s side door jamb. Tread matters, too. Check the tread by putting a penny into the tire’s grooves with the Lincoln’s head upside down and facing you. If you can see Lincoln’s head, it’s time for new tires. Remember to check the pressure and tread of your spare tire as well, so that you won’t be stranded on the side of the road while everyone else is heading to the beach. 3) Look under the hood Spending 15 minutes every month under the hood of your vehicle may prevent 70 percent of problems that lead to highway breakdowns, according to Deanna Sclar, author of Auto Repair for Dummies. Squeeze hoses to test for cracks and check for frayed belts that could indicate leaks. Check the battery, as higher temperatures can take a toll. Don’t forget to monitor your vehicle’s fluid levels, as well. The big five – oil, coolant, transmission, power steering and brake – keep your car running. Low fluid levels could indicate a hose leak or a larger problem. Remember to add windshield cleaner to help get the dirt and bugs off and keep visibility while driving. 4) Mind the suspension Cold winters mean potholes, dips, and bumps come summer. That’s bad news for your suspension. “If a pothole is big enough to eat a tire, there could be additional damage to the suspension,” Cappa says. “A misaligned steering wheel is a sure sign of potential damage or need for adjustment.” Replacing worn shocks, springs, and joints will make the steering more alert, causing the wheel to react directly and predictably so that you can have more control. A rule of thumb: if you turn the wheel and get little response until it’s at a 30-degree angle it’s time for a tune up. Ask the staff at Tyler’s Automotive to check for any issues during your next vehicle service. 5) Stay cool Keep air conditioning at a low, steady level instead of blasting it for short periods of time and then turning it off. Using the AC efficiently improves fuel economy and keeps your car in top shape. You should stay hydrated, too. Thirst can affect your ability to drive a prolonged, monotonous course (like a road trip) in the same way as a blood alcohol content of .08 or a lousy night’s sleep, according to researchers from Loughborough University in Leicestershire, U.K. In a recent study, subjects who didn’t drink any beverages for 10 hours made about twice as many mistakes, such as lane drifting and late breaking, during a two-hour drive simulation. “Drinking enough water is a big piece of the driver equation,” says Brock Christopher of Porsche’s Human Experience Center. He recommends taking four to six gulps of water every 10 to 15 minutes during long drives.
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